Page 1

About 8 o’clock A. M., May 10th, 1862—the 29th Reg. M. V. with knapsacks well filled, three days rations in haversacks, forty rounds of cartridges in cartridge box, canteens filled with water, and our trusty Enfield on our shoulder, started towards Fortress Monroe from Camp Butler, Newport News, but our destination was unknown to us…

Page 2

…pilot bread, commonly called “hard tack”—or Hardee’s tactics. While here we received the mail. After staying here about two hours, we moved towards Camp Hamilton about half a mile distant where we made arrangements to stop for the night. Went into quarters over the long cavalry stables and unslung knapsacks &c. but in a few…

Page 3

…were not long in getting into line when we started on towards the Fortress, arriving there an hour or more before sundown, when we halted near the [Hygeia] Hotel where we “right dressed!” rested and fell in, right dressed several times, then “Forward! March!” Went on board the steamer Adelaide just before dark and about…

Page 4

…the marines gave us three cheers in response to ours as did the other men-of-wars of which we passed several boats. We steamed on towards Willoughby’s Point but as we subsequently ascertained, left that point on the right and steered for Ocean View, or to a point near there, where we traveled over the decks…

Page 5

…more, where we halted, and expected to remain there for the remainder of the night, but the Col. said we must march on to a better camping spot and very reluctantly our tired limbs were compelled to move on through mud and water three or four miles farther when we arrived at a camp by…

Page 6

…from fleas, flies, &c. to a warmer but infested husk bed in a horse stable. This was the first of my experience in sleeping outdoors. Towards morning, I awoke and found out that I was cold. An overcoat did not seem to be all that my system needed to keep myself warm enough to sleep….

Page 7

…the first I had seen for a good while, but I concluded not to eat much of it as I did not know what effect it would have upon my digestive organs. Not that I expected it might be poisoned for the rebs had left in such haste (they left hot coffee in the stoves…

Page 8

…of the meat into the stoves to cook, we were again ordered to fall in, and resume our march to Norfolk for we knew we were destined to enter Norfolk that day which we did about noon. About two miles from Norfolk, we entered the breastworks which was said to be five miles in length…

Page 9

…street where we halted for a few minutes, when we returned to where we had left our overcoats. We remained here long enough to get some “squares reduced” (Pilot bread) and a few raw hams also reduced. This was falling off considerably from soft bread, fresh beef, potatoes, &c. as hog seldom “goes down” with…

Page 10

Wednesday morning at 6 o’clock, May 14th, got into line, marched on towards Norfolk, through the city to the Portsmouth Ferry where we crossed to that city during a light rain, and from thence on to the Marine Hospital. During the afternoon our baggage arrived including knapsacks, tents, &c. which first, were very gladly received….